1999
Publication:
Fannie Mae Foundation

The large influx of immigrants to the United States and New York City from poorer countries has sparked considerable debate as to whether immigrants are becoming a public charge to American society. Most arguments have centered around immigrants' use of cash assistance programs. This article compares immigrants' receipt of rental housing assistance with that of native-born Americans. Bivariate analyses reveal that immigrants, as a group, are no more likely than native-born households to use any form of rental housing assistance. Indeed, in most instances immigrants are less likely than native-born households to receive assistance, with two exceptions: immigrants who have been in the United States since 1970 and immigrants from the former Soviet Union in New York City. Multivariate analyses reveal similar results, except that immigrants who have been in the United States since 1970 are no more likely than other immigrants to receive housing assistance when other factors are controlled.

Related Documents
Related Topics