2003 Winner
Winners:
KwaZulu Natal Province, South Africa
2003
Publication:
Impumelelo Innovations Award Trust
Sponsored By:
Impumelelo Innovations Award Trust
Jurisdiction:
South Africa
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KZN has amongst the highest statistics of HIV/AIDS and violence against women in the country. Ukuba Nesibindi HIV/AIDS and Gender Violence Programmes is an extremely crucial service for the community of Durban. The high crime rate, HIV infection, unemployment and poverty are some of the factors that constantly remind society that its people have many stresses that might need some counseling; a lot of innocent lives depend on our ability to keep this service running. A drop-in centre was established at Warwick Junction, which is also known, as "The Gateway to Durban", where +- 400 000 people from the Greater Durban Community pass through on a daily basis; by taxi, train and bus. Objectives are to provide a drop-in face-to-face counseling facility, to provide a central place where prevention programmes can be implemented, to develop community outreach projects, to reach "hard-to-reach" groups, to engage in advocacy and lobbying by forming constructive and relevant partnerships.

Innovation: The LifeLine outreach centre Ukuba Nesibindi is the only one of its kind in the Ethekweni UniCity district. It is a LifeLine prototype providing dynamic intervention programmes in the greatest of need. With the Community Outreach programme, 439 people have been trained in various communities' central and north of Durban by our staff and volunteers. The programme has also been approached by community members from Qolo Qolo, Ndwedwe, Groutville, Adams Mission; by 2 doctors working with HIV/AIDS in an informal settlement of 93 000; by the Amaqadi Tribal Authority, a rural village with 10 000 inhabitants. One NB component of the Outreach Programme is creating social awareness.

 

Effectiveness: The increased demand for this service has lead to a number of serious challenges, the major one being lack of capacity and a shortage of funds. Programmes managed form 1/3/2002 to 5/6/2003 achieved the following: AIDS - voluntary counseling & testing 2057 clients, ongoing counseling 119 clients, 2x support groups 105, 6x community 456, 29x Awareness Campaigns 4070 reached. Drug Prevention & Life Skills - 20+ youth on the streets per week. Rape - Ukuba Nesibindi and Prince Mishyeni 496. Domestic Violence - Counseling and Support of 60 clients. Sew Worker Outreach - 210 girls already reached 5 had VCT 15 returned to school, 3 returned home, 3+4 participated in ECPAT Peer Group training in Johannesburg. Literacy - 40 children per week in groups of 10 per session between 1st March and 31st Aug 2002. Restorative Practice - Intensive therapy with groups of young living with AIDS. Educare - Provided Mon-Fri for 27 toddlers.

Poverty Impact: The provision of this NB service addresses all the relevant social problems attached to poverty. It creates a higher standard of living, vastly affecting poverty indirectly.

Sustainability: The amount of R230 000 is requested to support the extension of the Gender Violence and VCT projects that have been running since March 2002. Most of the LifeLine volunteer counselors we refer to are unemployed and cannot afford transport to the centre and so to facilitate this training, funding will urgently have to be sourced for their transport as well as the other costs involved in setting up and maintaining this training. Funds to assist with the management of the other 4 programmes (Literacy, Educare, Restorative Practice and Drug Prevention-Life Skills) are raised by the Child and Youth Care Dept of the Durban Institute of Technology.

Replication: is both possible and necessary. The model presented in this project has been proven to be more than effective for replication.