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  1721

Spotlight

New Online Event: Using (Excel) .NetMap for Social Network Analysis
     

October 27, 2008:  12-2 pm (EDT)

~Online event. Registration required, and free of charge.~

(Excel) .NetMap is an add-in for Office 2007 that provides social network diagram and analysis tools in the context of a spreadsheet. Adding the directed graph chart type to Excel opens up many possibilities for easily manipulating networks and controlling their display properties.

In this tutorial the steps needed to install and operate (Excel) .NetMap are reviewed. The (Excel) .NetMap add-in provides directed graph charting features within Excel, allowing users to create node-link diagrams with control over each node and edge color, size, transparency and shape. Since .NetMap builds within Excel, all of the controls and programmatic features of Office are available. Additional features of (Excel) .NetMap generate social networks from data sources like personal e-mail (drawing data from the Windows Desktop Search engine). Arbitrary edge lists (anything that can be pasted into Excel) can be visualized and analyzed in .NetMap.

This session will provide a walk through the basic operation of .NetMap. Attendees are encouraged to bring an edge list of interest. Sample data sets will be provided. Techniques for time slicing and filtering networks will be highlighted. You may download the Excel .NetMap Add-in and slides visit in advance of this tutorial.

Register now - Please fill out some basic information if you are interested in attending.

Instructions - Review these instructions and practice logging in ahead of time (Try it now!).

Questions? Contact us.


More on our panel:

The tutorial will be conducted by Marc Smith with an introduction by David Lazer.

Marc Smith is a senior research sociologist at Microsoft Research specializing in the social organization of online communities and computer mediated interaction. He founded the Community Technologies Group and is now part of the Internet Services Research Center at Microsoft Research in Silicon Valley.  He is the co-editor of Communities in Cyberspace (Routledge), a collection of essays exploring the ways identity; interaction and social order develop in online groups.

Smith's research focuses on computer-mediated collective action: the ways group dynamics change when they take place in and through social cyberspaces. Many "groups" in cyberspace produce public goods and organize themselves in the form of a commons (see related papers). Smith's goal is to visualize these social cyberspaces, mapping and measuring their structure, dynamics and life cycles. He has developed the "Netscan" engine that allows researchers studying Usenet newsgroups to get reports on the rates of posting, posters, crossposting, thread length and frequency distributions of activity. These data have revealed a complex online social ecosystem populated by multiple social roles.

David M.J. Lazer, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Program on Networked Governance, teaches courses on regulation and public management. Lazer has an overarching interest in the process by which connections emerge among actors and the consequences that the resultant network has for individuals and the system. He recently edited (with Viktor Mayer-Schoenberger) Governance and Information Technology: From Electronic Government to Information Government. He has also written extensively on the use of DNA in the criminal justice system. Finally, he is an authority on social network analysis, with a series of papers on the diffusion of information among interest groups and between interest groups and the government.

 


   

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